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Author Archive for Bob Zimmerman

As Geneca's CTO, Bob Zimmerman continues to build on his work as the driving force behind Getting Predictable, the requirements definition and project best practices that are the foundation of Geneca’s mission to make software development predictable. He continues to extend these best practices to leverage more value for clients and new growth opportunities for Geneca.

How to Avoid Being Stalked By Scope Creep: The Project Charter

scope-300Scope Creep. Sometimes it’s politically motivated. Sometimes it’s intentional. Sometimes it’s a misunderstanding. But it’s always painful.

Silence is not agreement; Don’t let others hold their breath

speakup2It’s not often, but I believe we have all experienced the meeting that goes too smoothly.

There’s anywhere from four to eight people, trapped with each other for an hour, around our favorite conference table.

The 3 Great Interrupters: Meetings, Management and Drive-Bys

interruptors-300x199Recently, we’ve introduced Commitment Based Estimation  to a couple of our software teams. Typically, this helps a team provide highly-accurate estimates. These teams go on to deliver successfully by meeting these estimates.

Delivering Successfully is like the Matrix: It’s All In Your Head

matrix-300x269

In this blog I usually  write about best practices that help set teams up for success. That is really what Getting Predictable is about.

Project Retrospectives: When looking forward makes more sense than looking backward

iStock_000016701854SmallRecently a consultant asked me if I encourage teams to do a project postmortem or retrospective once a project is done.  The goal is to review what worked well and what didn’t.

Winning with “Project SD”

Winning-with-Project-SDEvery team needs a process they can embrace because they know that process will get them to the desired result.

Announce Changes and Avoid Wig-Outs

breaking pencilIn previous posts, I have discussed best practices around Change Control. Or, maybe I should say “lack of best practices” since so many organizations either fail to follow a defined process or simply don’t have one.