Subscribe via RSS Feed

Alignment: Antidote to Rework

Alignment-Antidote-to-Rework1In my last post, I introduced the Getting Predictable℠ Best Practices and explained  how they are designed to set project teams up for success “from the start”.  These practices cover three areas: Alignment, Commitment and Visibility.

Now I am going to dive deeper into the  concept of alignment and why it is critical to reducing rework and helping any team (not just IT) meet its  expectations, each and every time.

What is Alignment?

With technology initiatives, the goal of best practices around alignment looks like this: The business stakeholders all have a common answer to the question, “What is success for this project”?  In other words, they have agreement when the team can stop and everyone can  high-five because they all got what they needed.

At the other extreme (and this is the problem we are trying to solve), we don’t want the business to say to the team: “We have a really critical schedule, so you guys start and we’ll figure it out later”.

Why is it so important to focus on aligning the business stakeholders?  Isn’t it more important to focus on aligning the technology team to the business? No it is not more important – and this answer is of huge importance!

The technology team can’t align to the business goals if the business doesn’t agree on those goals! In other words, if the business isn’t in alignment, how can a technology team align?

What are they aligning to?

More importantly, a lack of alignment on the business side means there is almost certainly rework ahead for the technology team.  As the business goes through the process of coming into alignment, the IT team needs to make constant adjustments.  Sometimes in small ways, but other times the change can be significant and involve removing or changing an entire component of the solution.

When was the last time rework got extra schedule or budget?

This blog will cover those Getting Predictable℠ Best Practices that focus on helping the business get alignment on answering this question:  “What is the definition of success for this project?”.

Alignment is a great idea, but I don’t think it can work for me

Now you  might be thinking: “I can’t get my business folks to a single meeting, let alone get them to agree!” In future posts, I will share best practices that have worked for me. They don’t all work, and they don’t apply to all situations, but I have come to rely on these simple practices to get the results I am looking for.

And there is a huge side benefit.  By helping the business come into alignment on the key objectives of a project, I end up building a new level of trust in my relationship with the business team.  This truly was a pleasant surprise.

You will find some past posts, as well as future posts that focus on key areas such as:

  • Facilitation techniques
  • Aligning the business when they are geographically distributed
  • How to align interested parties that aren’t decision makers
  • Being adaptive to change and protecting alignment
  • When a lack of alignment is ok

So what do you think?

Do you believe this is a problem in your world?  How bad is it? I’d love to hear examples in the comments below.  If you don’t have this problem, why?  What do you believe you are doing right?

Getting Predictable℠ is a collection of best practices 
that set teams up for success from the start.

Tags: , , , , ,

Category: Business-IT Alignment, For Practitioners, Team Performance

  • Cathy Brunsting

    I am a big believer in alignment. One thing that I’ve been thinking about is alignment when there is only one stakeholder. What is needed in order to set up the team for success in this case?

    I think that it is still important to define what success means in a clear, unambiguous way *from the business perspective*, so that the IT team can be in alignment with the business stakeholder. The process to get this alignment may be simplified, but is still critical to the success of the project.

    • @Cathy: I agree Cathy. Even with one stakeholder, it’s important that there aren’t any key ambiguities (what we call spellcheckers) and that folks that aren’t in the room (or join the team later), can easily understand goals and they need to align to.